The ArtiSynth Project

February 10, 2008

CGI (Computer Generated Imagery) Computer Simulation is a powerful tool used by many computer scientists and engineers to simulate complicated physical systems and design new technologies. This powerful technique is currently employed by the UBC Media and Graphics Interdisciplinary Center (MAGIC) in their ArtiSynth Project.

ArtiSynth is a 3D Biomechanical Modeling Toolkit that allows computer scientists, engineers and even regular doctors to make complicated mathematical predictions of the human body. By combining rigid-body skeletal components as well as 3D finite element soft-body objects, the program allows its users to model the complex biomechanical interactions that occurs between the rigid bones and the soft muscles of the human body.

Though it is still in its development phase, ArtiSynth is already used in many medical research projects including the OPAL Project.

Using ArtiSynth, researchers have constructed a 3D computer model of the human pharyngeal and laryngeal complex. This model can be used to measure internal forces and neuromotor activation levels of the muscles around the oralpharangeal area and determine the effects of muscle damage and paralysis (due to surgery or stroke) on swallowing and speech.

The ArtiSynth Project
http://www.magic.ubc.ca/artisynth/pmwiki.php?n=Main.HomePage
OPAL Project
http://www.magic.ubc.ca/artisynth/pmwiki.php?n=OPAL.HomePage
 

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UPCOMING EVENT: Beyond the Human Genome Sequence: 4th Annual SBN Career Expo & Conference

January 26, 2008

You are invited to attend the 4th Annual Student Biotechnology Network Career Expo & Conference. This would be good networking opportunity for those undergraduates looking for a career in the sciences outside of generic laboratory work.

Date: Wed. February 13, 2008

Time: 4:45-9:00 PM

Location: Westin Bayshore, 1601 Bayshore Dr, Vancouve, B.C.

 

About SBN:

The Student Biotechnology Network is a not-for-profit organization that provides an autonomous forum for students to discuss and explore interests and opportunities relating to the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. The network brings together students from a diverse range of departments and professional schools relating to biotechnology, including the life sciences, engineering, commerce, law and the arts. The network represents the interests of its student members to the university and to those groups in the community that will determine the future of biotechnology in this region.

The Career Expo and Conference offers a mix of both educational seminars and exposure to over 75 industry representatives from 25 participating organizations. Throughout the event, students will be able to visit booths from local and international biotech companies, government organizations and academic institutions.

For more information and to register please visit the SBN website.


UPCOMING EVENT: Beyond the Human Genome Sequence: Entering the Era of Genomic Medicine

April 1, 2007

You are invited to attend an insightful discussion by one of today’s leaders in genomics, Dr. Eric Green.This event is free of charge, presented by Genome BC.

Date: Thursday, April 12

Time: 7pm (doors open at 6.30pm)

Location: Science World at Telus World of Science

1455 Quebec Street

About the Speaker:

Eric D. Green, M.D., Ph.D. is the Scientific Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, a position he has held since 2002. In addition, he serves as Chief of the NHGRI Genome Technology Branch (since 1996) and Director of the NIH Intramural Sequencing Center (since 1997).

Dr. Green received his B.S. degree in Bacteriology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1981, and his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Washington University in 1987. Since the early 1990s, Dr. Green’s research program has been at the forefront of efforts to map, sequence, and understand eukaryotic genomes. His work included significant, start-to-finish involvement in the Human Genome Project. More recently, Dr. Green established a program in comparative genomics that involves the generation and comparative analyses of sequences from targeted genomic regions in multiple evolutionarily diverse species. His laboratory has directly utilized its own mapping and sequence data to identify and characterize several human disease genes, including those implicated in certain forms of hereditary deafness, vascular disease, and inherited peripheral neuropathy.

For more information and to register for this event, visit the GenomeBC website.


Canada Health Infoway – Updates

March 18, 2007

Canada Health Infoway is an organization launched in 2001 to implement an interoperable EHR across 50 per cent of Canada (by population) by the end of 2009.

Here are a few updates:

For more information, please visit: http://www.infoway-inforoute.ca/


VanBUG Event: The UniProt Protein Knowledgebase

March 6, 2007

Date/Time: March 8, 2007, 6:00pm
Speaker: Amos Bairoch
Title: The UniProt Protein Knowledgebase: trends and challenges
Affiliation: Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics

You are invited to meet with Dr. Bairoch individually or as a group
(e.g. a lab visit), on Thursday, March 8 or Friday, March 9.
Individual meetings can be set up at at the UBC Bioinformatics Centre,
but it is also possible to schedule meetings for Dr. Bairoch at other
labs on the main UBC campus or off campus.

Student Speaker:
Siddhartha Srivastava
Title:
D-GRIP: A genotype analysis system to predict genetic risk
profile for an individual.


Celebrating Research Week – The Heart of Diabetes

March 3, 2007

March 10, 8:00am – 2:30pm

Join CKNW’s Dr. Art Hister’s House Calls live from UBC’s free public forum and province-wide webcast where researchers will explore and discuss what’s new in the fight against diabetes and its cardiovascular complications.

This event will be held at the Life Sciences Centre, Theatre 2 – 2350 Health Sciences Mall. More information can be found at www.med.ubc.ca/research/events.


UBC student recovers heart function after needing two heart pumps

February 23, 2007

Some of you might remember a posting from last November about how artificial heart pumps can be used to rejuvenate dying hearts.  It turns out that the only person in Canada and one of very few people in the world to have recovered heart function after needing two simultaneous heart pumps to keep her heart pumping is a UBC student, Marrie!

 Read her story